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Thursday, January 07, 2016

St. Andrew's United Presbyterian Church ~

At the corner of Jefferson and McKean. 
First worship service 1804.

8 comments:

James Zambroski said...

This church being half a block from St. Paul's and directly across the street from the junior high, we passed by and saw it a lot. It was always a weird appearing building, built so close to the street and without the sweeping entry (ala St. Paul's, St. Peter's and St. Michael's) that we'd grown accustomed to. I was always a little intimidated by what I perceived to be the lack of friendliness. Not true, I'm sure, but as a kid, the place was kind of foreboding.

Anonymous said...

I would like to see what it actually looked like in 1804-without the added sections, or any renovations that may have been done.

Bob Orsborn said...

Go to www.standrewsupc.org for more information about the church including building and facilities.

Anonymous said...

Three generations of our family grew up in this church. Have many wonderful memories. The sanctuary is beautiful and the pews used to be filled every Sunday. Over the decades this church had many excellent preachers. There was a full and vibrant church membership until the mid seventies when the United Presbyterian Church started to break apart. A lot of members left this church to become charter members of the Westminster Presbyterian Church of America now on North Main Street in Butler.

Anonymous said...

Can't imagine what James Zambroski means by "sweeping entry". Both St. Paul and St. Peter churches are also right on the street. No building, be it a church or otherwise, should give you the feeling of "friendliness". Certainly not a few extra steps to walk up to the door would define "friendliness". How the people who "worship" in those churches act outside of their church may be a better way of claiming "friendliness".

To make a statement then add ". . . probably not true, but . . ." is a sneaky way of bad-mouthing those of another church then pretending to add a disclaimer. That would be "a lack of friendliness".

Paul Tinker said...

I grew up in this church. Many great spiritual times were had there. It had a great interior, wonderful organ, vibrant choir, and excellent teaching. When the UPC splintered we went to the PCA. I wouldn't give up the memories and spiritual teaching that my family received in the church for anything

D. Johnston said...

This was my church as a youngster when we first moved to Butler in the 50's. My teen years were positively influenced by Luther Braham's Sunday School class. He knew everyone by name and would address you directly throughout the lesson. We also had a good after
school youth program. The first minister I remember was Reverend French then later James Maynor. I was even an usher at one time.
Unfortunately I have drifted away, but have lots of fond memories.

Anonymous said...

The leaders and members of this church always did a lot for the youth. From the dedicated Sunday School teachers, to everyone who helped to make the Wednesday after school Youth Group interesting and fun. They also had one of the best structured Senior High Fellowship groups that met every Sunday evening. Memorable weekend retreats for senior high students were held annually at Westminster Highlands and at Seneca Hills.

In the early 1970s Dan Perrin helped to lead this group. He also helped to make Butler's non-denominational group Young Life a great place for Butler's teenagers to fellowship together. There were a lot of teenagers in those days.