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Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Time Capsule ~

by: Matt Viser
1 September 2016

8 comments:

BHS '98 said...

The writer interviewed members at the 40th reunion. They gave him a sincere, realistic view of the feelings in Butler. Thanks.

Anonymous said...

It’s a sad thing. I graduated from BHS in 1965,followed the mold I guess,went to work at Armco,an 18 year old making a hundred bucks plus every week,high heaven. My future seemed secure and I was safe from all harm. After all my Dad raised 5 kids while working there and we weren’t rich but went to parochial school and had all we needed. Alas,I was drafted and went into the Air Force instead,fully planning to serve my hitch,come back to Butler,maybe use the GI bill to go to college or just settle back into the mill. After all,they held my job and I earned seniority while in the military. Life looked pretty darned secure. Life is never simple,I found I liked the Air Force life and decided to stay,often wondering if I should have stayed in Butler. I watched my hometown fall apart from afar or through the eyes of my sisters. Sometimes I couldn’t believe what they were telling me about downtown drying up,drug problems and all. When I went to visit I could see the decay taking place as I walked around town. My sisters stayed,I and my brothers moved away,never to return to live. I ache for those struggling there. I will always remember Butler as the vibrant,friendly happy community I knew and am very thankful to have been a part of it.

Bob Dorcy

Anonymous said...

No one counts our blessings!

Anonymous said...

Mr. Dorcy, Thanks for sharing your experience.
The decision of " Should I stay or should I go." with credit to the Comfort Inn ad. still seems to be current 50 years later.
Some ambitious young people are still repelled by Butler’s immobile, class-ridden society and make the decision to leave. Today there are even less opportunities in Our Fair City than there were in Mr. Dorcy's time.

The Boston Globe article and Mr. Dorcy's comments have helped me conclude that I made the right decision to leave. I am countiog my blessings.

A Native Son That Has Gone For Good.

Bill Sherman said...

This city is still great! It is probably better than before. It has a beautiful Rite-Aid on Main St. and a beautiful prison down the street. I live here and there are many lovely houses on Brady St. and Butler Memorial Park is easily one of the best parks around!

Anonymous said...

I agree with Bill Sherman. There is a beautiful Dollar General up the street from me. Great deals and such nice people working there!

Anonymous said...

There is a place my family and I travel to called The Burger Hut. It is up on a hill. Some of the best food my family and I have ever eaten. We travel over 75 miles once a year to eat there. Great dining!

Al said...

Pullman Standard closed in 1981 because the company was bought by Wheelabrator-Frye that owned a similar plant in the Southern states. The decision was made to produce all rail cars in the southern plant and close the Butler plant. A sad victim of corporate greed brought about by Wall Street influence on corporate America to increase profits by any means possible. I lost many faithful customers at my business when Pullman closed.